Category Archives: Blog

Suffrage 125: No voice in parliament

Imagine campaigning for legislative change without a representative voice in parliament. Can you grasp the challenges? During the campaign for women’s suffrage in South Australia women had no voice in parliament. The political rights afforded to men, and not to women, were what the Women’s Suffrage League and others were...

Suffrage 125: The First Executive

Last month we learned about the formation and role of the Women’s Suffrage League, but who were the key players? This month we explore the lives of a few key individuals from the Women’s Suffrage League, specifically those who were part of the first executive committee – that is the...

Suffrage 125: Women’s Suffrage League

When resistance occurs citizens in a democracy organise to effect change. When Dr Edward Stirling  advocated the extension of the franchise to women, the House of Assembly passed his motion affirming the desirability of recognising women’s political rights; but when the Bill was introduced to give effect to the motion,...

Suffrage 125: Temperance and women’s activism

A movement cannot happen without people, and people unite in groups to achieve big gains. This goes for women’s suffrage in South Australia too. Many groups supported the cause for equal voting rights between men and women. Before the Women’s Suffrage League (which we will learn more about next month)...

Suffrage 125: ‘The Political Franchise for Women’

It is correct to assume that the achievement of women’s suffrage in South Australia was pragmatically undertaken by women and men. Still today, women’s rights are issues for people of all gender identities, and not only the responsibility of women. One such man, Dr Edward Charles Stirling (1848-1919), a surgeon,...

Suffrage 125: South Australian women in the nineteenth century

2019 marks 125 years since women won the right to vote and stand for parliament in the Colony of South Australia. Aboriginal women were not excluded from the legislation, however were not actively encouraged to exercise their rights. Looking back, what was life in South Australia like for most non-indigenous...

Activism Now: Call for Participation

Activism Now: Call for Participation What is this project about? This project will explore contemporary activism, as practiced by young South Australians (18 to 25 years old) who identify as women. It will include a diverse range of subjects and causes. The project has various opportunities for individuals to participate....

Compulsory Voting in Australia: Effects, Public Acceptance and Democratic Justification

Compulsory voting has been a major feature of Australian electoral arrangements for almost a century and it has proved to be a very effective and well-tolerated mechanism for maintaining high voter turnout. What explains the relatively high public acceptance of the practice in this country? And what conditions need to...

Think Global: International climate movements

This talk highlights key differences in the start, evolution and focus of climate movements in Australia, the United States and the United Kingdom. In particular, the conceptions of climate justice adopted and expressed in the climate movement in each country is markedly different. It is argued that these different conceptions...

Think Global: Queer Rights and Southeast Asia

While now recognised by the UN and leading democratic states (if still incompletely and often haphazardly), LGBTQ rights are denied in many other quarters. In Southeast Asia, ASEAN has implemented a regional human rights regime, albeit one which declined to incorporate standard global protections around discrimination in relation to sexuality...